Trevor Noah Comes to Chrissy Teigen’s Defense, Blames Social Media For Her Bullying Scandal

Daily Show host Trevor Noah is known for his outlandish takes, but his latest one where he came to Chrissy Teigen’s defense for her bullying scandal has even been called out by his supporters for missing the mark.

In his monologue, Noah states that “we can all agree” that Teigen has been a “horrible person.” He then, however, adds “online” after that, thereby making it seem like she is only being a horrible person on the internet.

Media outlet “Mic” sums up the intent of what he said by writing, “What Noah is pointing out is that perhaps Teigen isn’t an evil person — the internet makes it really easy to hurl insults you’d never in a million years say to another human in real life.”

In another attempt to downplay the situation, Noah also pointed out in the monologue that “let’s be real, Chrissy Teigen was far from the only a**hole on Twitter.”

Last month, Teigen apologized for decade-old tweets and DMs that recently resurfaced in which she relentlessly attacked a then-teenage Courtney Stodden and has stepped away from social media as well as been cancelled from everything from product lines to a minor role in a Netflix series.

Yesterday, shortly after Teigen published a second apology about her past tweets — designer Michael Costello spoke out about Teigen harassing him online in 2014.

The “Project Runway” alum, who posted screenshots of his Twitter DMs with Teigen, said the bullying was so bad that he’s still “traumatized, depressed and has thoughts of suicide” over what he endured from Teigen.

From Huffpost:

“Roasting people, dunking on them, that’s how you get the likes, that’s how you get the retweets, it’s how you have ‘fun,’” Noah said. “It’s how you get to be part of the group.”

He noted that trending topics on Twitter — which he called the “internet’s septic tank” — are usually negative. When people engage in this negativity, he said, it encourages them to say the “nastiest things that they can think of” to become part of the conversation. 

“And then all of a sudden, the outrage they were a part of turns on them,” he said. “And that’s not a mistake. It’s how the system is set up to keep us all online, and to keep making money for the platforms.”

Noah closed his discussion by referencing Teigen’s husband, musician John Legend.

“I’m not saying every tweet has to be smiles and gumdrops,” Noah said. “We can still be humans, we can still have fun. But maybe just aim for that giant space between Chrissy Teigen hate tweets, and any John Legend song.”