Democratic Civil War Brewing: Bernie Sanders Supporters Express Support for a Primary Challenge to Elizabeth Warren in Massachusetts Senate Race

Twitter was set ablaze of Democratic Party infighting between the supporters of the presidential candidates Senators Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren. Warren recently appeared on a town hall on CNN and was questioned about how she and every other candidate on the debate stage in Nevada indicated that the candidate with a plurality of delegates should not necessarily be the nominee. This means that the candidate with the most delegates, but not the majority should not automatically receive the Democratic nomination. The number of delegates needed to win the nomination is 1,991 out of 3,979. Vox has an extremely informative article with regard to the delegate process. Read it here.

The voter questioning Warren expressed concern that the will of the voters could be overruled by the other candidates and the Democratic National Committee (DNC). Warren replied by saying, “You do know that was Bernie’s position in 2016? … The way I see it is you write the rules before you know where everybody stands and then you stick with those rules.” 

She continues, “Bernie had a big hand in writing these rules. I didn’t write them, but Bernie did. When they were putting together the 2016 platform for the Democratic Convention, those are the rules that he wanted to write … I don’t see how you get to change them just because he now thinks there’s an advantage to him.” Watch the clip below:

As a result of this escalation of tension between Sanders and Warren, Sanders supporters have called for Warren to be primaried for her United States Senate seat in Massachusetts. One Twitter user compared this to Saint Patrick removing the snakes in Ireland. View it below: 

Bill Parmer, who is the political analyst of the Palmer Report described Sanders supporters of being a “cult” and are on a destructive path. View his analysis below: 

American music critic and journalist defended Sanders by stating it is disingenuous to say that he wrote all of the superdelegate rules by himself and that if he truly had his way, there would be no superdelegates at all. He also included the argument that this critique is coming from the people who complained that 2016 Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton won the popular vote, but lost the Electoral College. View it below: 

It should be noted that if Warren does not win the Democratic nomination or presidency, and continues to be a United States Senator from Massachusetts, she will be up for re-election in 2024. She most recently won re-election in 2018 with no primary challenge and won the general election with over 60% of the vote.

This increase competition between all of the Democratic candidates comes a week before the Super Tuesday primary states vote. The states of Alabama, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, and Virginia will vote on Tuesday, March 3. Fox News compiled a detailed list of the states and their individual delegate allocation rules. Read them below: 

Alabama: The state holds an open primary, with the 61 delegates being awarded on a proportional basis.

American Samoa: The territory holds an open caucus, with the territory awarding 11 delegates, of which 6 are pledged delegates allocated on the basis of the results of the caucuses.

Arkansas: The state holds an open primary, with the 36 delegates being awarded on a proportional basis.

California: The state holds a semi-closed primary – meaning only Democrats and unaffiliated voters can cast a ballot, with the 494 delegates being awarded on a proportional basis.

Colorado: The state holds a semi-closed primary – meaning only Democrats and unaffiliated voters can cast a ballot, with the 80 delegates being awarded on a proportional basis.

Democrats Abroad: This is an open primary in which any U.S. citizen living abroad who is a member of Democrats Abroad can participate, with the 17 delegates being awarded on a proportional basis.

Maine: The state holds a closed primary – meaning only Democrats can cast a ballot, with the 32 delegates being awarded on a proportional basis.

Massachusetts: The state holds a semi-closed primary – meaning only Democrats and unaffiliated voters can cast a ballot, with the 114 delegates being awarded on a proportional basis.

Minnesota: The state holds an open primary, with the 91 delegates being awarded on a proportional basis.

North Carolina: The state holds a semi-closed primary – meaning only Democrats and unaffiliated voters can cast a ballot, with the 122 delegates being awarded on a proportional basis.

Oklahoma: The state holds a semi-closed primary – meaning only Democrats and unaffiliated voters can cast a ballot, with the 42 delegates being awarded on a proportional basis.

Tennessee: The state holds an open primary, with the 73 delegates being awarded on a proportional basis.

Texas: The state holds an open primary, with the 261 delegates being awarded on a proportional basis.

Utah: The state holds an open primary, with the 35 delegates being awarded on a proportional basis.

Vermont: The state holds an open primary, with the 24 delegates being awarded on a proportional basis.

Virginia: The state holds an open primary, with the 124 delegates being awarded on a proportional basis.